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99 PERCENT MINE by Sally Thorne

I was in need of a palate cleanser after a few recent stressful reads, so when I saw 99 Percent Mine on the New Releases shelf at the library, I grabbed it. I had read Thorne’s The Hating Game earlier this year and enjoyed it a lot, so I though I’d give her next book a try too.

99 Percent Mine has a similar setup to The Hating Game. Darcy Barrett and her twin brother Jamie grew up with a boy in the neighborhood named Tom Valeska. Tom and Jamie were best friends, while Darcy and Tom had a more complicated relationship: they were deeply drawn to each other, but Darcy, afraid of Tom’s feelings for her, escaped from him when she was 18 by leaving to travel the world. It’s now many years later, and Darcy is still single, living alone and bartending in between her long periods of traveling. Tom has gotten engaged, and Jamie and Darcy are not on speaking terms because they disagree with what to do with their late grandmother’s cottage, which she left them to them to renovate and sell.

Tom, a contractor, appears on Darcy’s doorstep (she’s living in the cottage) to begin the renovations. With the two now living in close quarters, their feelings for each other are harder to ignore. And so begins a long buildup of serious tension, will-they-or-won’t-they and ok-they-did-but-will-it-stick? Sounds like The Hating Game, right? I got sucked into this story, like I did with her last book, and mostly enjoyed the ride, but when I got to the end, I found it sort of silly. There was something so appealing about The Hating Game’s Josh Templeman and Lucy Hutton and their tortured road to happiness, while Darcy and Tom just seem… stubborn and inconsistent. Thorne worked so hard to draw out the tension and keep her characters apart that she forgot that the story had to make sense. Darcy was contradictory and inconsiderate, vacillating between pining for Tom and trying to be tough and sexy. Tom was compelling but unrealistically insecure. It got tiresome by the end, and when it came time for the two to be together, Thorne invented a flimsy reason to keep them apart for a few more chapters.

99 Percent Mine was a quick, light read, but it wasn’t as fun or irresistible as its predecessor. It did do its job: I am now ready for meatier fare.

I listened to 99 Percent Mine on audio, and the narration was the best part. Jayme Mattler’s raspy, sexy voice was just perfect for Darcy – tough yet vulnerable at the same time. And her Tom was also perfect, which isn’t always the case when female narrators perform male characters. Listening on audio definitely enhanced my enjoyment of the book.

THE HATING GAME by Sally Thorne

Like so much of life – relationships, career moves – reading is all about timing. Sometimes you’re in the mood for a particular kind of book, and sometimes you’re not. It’s just timing. This is why I don’t plan my TBR – I just let it happen.

Recently, I had finished my audiobook and started the one I had planned to read next, a memoir about a man who had been on death row for 30 years for a crime that he didn’t commit. I listened to the first half hour or so, then picked up the print to see what I thought, and then came to the conclusion that it was just the wrong book for me at that time. It was well-written and extremely compelling, but I was too stressed out and preoccupied with life to get into it.

Instead, I picked up something light and fun, and it turned out to be exactly the right choice.

The Hating Game by Sally Thorne is about Lucy Hutton and Joshua Templeman, two junior executives at a publishing house who are bitter, angry rivals. They report to co-CEOs, a management structure dictated by the merger of two companies, and spend their days sitting outside their bosses’ offices playing immature games designed to unnerve, infuriate and enrage each other. Whether it’s staring, eavesdropping or making snarky comments, every action taken by these two is meant to sabotage and destroy the other.

So we all know what’s going to happen, right? But how Thorne gets Lucy and Josh from detesting each other to something very different is a great ride. Their banter is genuinely funny and clever, and the buildup of the physical tension between Lucy and Josh makes the pages turn quickly. I would have liked a *little* more hating – maybe two more chapters – before the wall began to crumble, but that’s a minor quibble. I also think The Hating Game wrapped up too quickly – as readers we should have had a little more time to enjoy its hard-won glory. But in all it was a great palate-cleanser. Every now and again, I need something like this to balance the depressing weight of my usual fare.

I listened to The Hating Game on audio (except when I just couldn’t put it down and picked up the print). I know I’m enjoying an audiobook when I bring my phone into the shower to listen. Katie Schorr was the perfect Lucy. I can’t imagine any other voice for that character!

If you’re in the mood for something light that will distract and entertain you, try The Hating Game. I was surprised to like it as much as I did.